Meeting the challenges of embedding the Internet of Things

May 05, 2014

Bernard Cole-May 05, 2014

One measure of that interest is the number of technical conferences and expositions devoting their attention to the IoT that have come into existence. This week, in addition to the Internet of Things Developer Conference in Santa Clara, Ca. there is the IoT Expo in San Francisco, Ca.

Last month there was IoT Asia 2014 in Singapore, and last week in the U.K., there was the M2M World Congress, one of the key enablers of IoT.  Next week there is the Internet of Things World in Palo Alto, Ca. and the IoT North America in Milwaukee, Wis. And next month in New York City, the Internet of Things Expo will be held..

Yet another measure of the intensity of interest are the number of articles, blogs, and news and product stories that have been submitted for publication on Embedded.com. Many of the most recent are included in this week's Tech Focus newsletter. Of these, my Editor's Top Picks are:

Getting ready for an IPv6-enabled Internet of Things
Implementing a Java-based MCU for the Internet of Things
Reworking the TCP/IP stack for use on embedded IoT devices

Of the aforementioned IoT conferences, the one that provides the most technical content is the IoT Developers Conference. Of the many papers and classes on the conference technical program, the ones that stand out because of their relevance to the tough problems developers will face include:

Understanding the Internet of Things Protocols (ME1177). In this presentation Stan Schneider of Real-Time Innovations uses his company's experience with the various publish/subscribe protocols at the heart of most IoT designs to sort through the four main protocols - MQTT, XMPP, DDS, and AMQP - and examines real use cases in military, medical, aviation and air traffic control, automotive test and safety, and energy. 

In Developing Internet of Things Applications (ME1192), Henrik Stahl, Oracle's VP of IoT and Java product management, will discuss some of the questions facing developers, such as why and how do you build IoT applications? What is the compelling value you will deliver, and what components and best practices should you use?

In Securing the Internet of Things (ME1182), Joe Fabbre of Green Hills Software discusses the security and privacy challenges introduced by IoT and how developers in the IoT world can use security to gain competitive advantage in their designs and their businesses.

As noted by Tyson Tuttle of Silicon Labs in The Internet of Things: the next wave of our connected world, the term was first used in the late 1990s to refer to wireless RFID networks, and now is associated with all things Internet connected, and represents both challenges and opportunities for embedded developers.

"The fundamental technologies, products, software, and tools necessary to create efficient, ultra-low-power connected devices for the IoT are available today," he writes. "In coming waves of IoT development, we’ll see the aggregation of connected devices into truly smart homes, smart factories, smart grids and smart cities."

The various constituents that make up the IoT – machine-to-machine and wireless sensor networks, wired and wireless home networking, wired and wireless industrial networks - have long been a topic of interest at Embedded.com and will continue to be.

In addition to watching for future Monday Tech Focus newsletters on the topic, a good way for you to keep up to date is to go regularly to "Embedded IoT design: tips, tricks and tutorials," a constantly updated list of both current and past design how-to’s, blogs. conference papers, and journal articles on the challenges the IoT transformation presents us.

I look forward to your participation in the form of contributed blogs and articles on Embedded.com, as well as your suggestions about design articles, papers, and conference journal links you think should be added to the list.

Embedded.com Site Editor Bernard Cole is also editor of the twice-a-week Embedded.com newsletters as well as a partner in the TechRite Associates editorial services consultancy. He welcomes your feedback. Send an email to bccole@acm.org, or call 928-525-9087.

See more articles and column like this one on Embedded.com. Sign up for subscriptions and newsletters. Copyright © 2014 UBM--All rights reserved.

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