Building Arduino breadboards without jumper wires

I receive an extraordinary number of emails from folks who have launched crowdfunding campaigns for various projects. This is probably because I’ve dipped my toes in the crowdfunding waters myself on occasion, plus the fact that I’ve posted several columns on projects that have particularly tweaked my fancy.

Some of these projects are large, complicated, and expensive, while others are small, low-cost, and easy to wrap one’s brain around. I particularly like the ones that make me exclaim, “D’oh! Why didn’t I think of that?” Speaking of which, I just received an email from a guy called Forrest Bao, in which he said:

Hi, I’d like to report an open-source project that can greatly speed up prototyping with the Arduino. It can eliminate the pain of using jumper wires between the Arduino and a breadboard. It’s currently in a crowdfunding campaign. Here is the link: www.crowdsupply.com/loser/breadshield

Eliminating jumper wires is always a good thing, but this message didn’t give much of an idea as to what we were talking about, so I bounced over to the project page to find:

(Source: Screenshot from video on Crowdsupply.com)

I have to admit that, at first, I wasn’t quite sure what I was seeing, but the video was short, sharp, and informative. It commenced by pointing out that many projects start out with an Arduino, breadboard, and jump wires.

(Source: Screenshot from video on Crowdsupply.com)

The video then explains the various ways in which jump wires fall short, after which we see a BreadShield connecting an Arduino directly to a breadboard.

(Source: Screenshot from video on Crowdsupply.com)


OMG! I thought. That’s brilliant! I immediately realized just how much time having one of these breakout boards would have saved me over the years.

Just to drive the point home, the video shows a series of “before” and “after” scenarios, such as the pair shown below:

(Source: Screenshot from video on Crowdsupply.com)

One of the things that I really like about this bodacious BreadShield beauty is the price. A fully assembled unit costs $13 with free shipping in the U.S. ($6 shipping worldwide). This isn’t too bad, but you can also get three of the little scamps in the form of boards and headers that you solder yourself for only $15, which is a much better proposition.

Even if you only need one for your own use, a good deal is a good deal, so you could pledge for three, keep one for yourself, give one to your best friend, and present the remaining unit to someone deserving with whom you wish to curry favor (hint, hint).

>> This article was originally published on our sister site, EEWeb: “Connect Arduino to Breadboard Without Jump Wires.”

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