Gesture interface design challenges & opportunities

A truth about the domination of the computer industry by personal computeris that it was – and continues to be – a major market for embedded devicehardware and software. In addition to the x86 that powers the operating system,the desktop PC is the home to at 8 to 12 or more MCUs embedded in the systemthat manage all the various user interface and communications operations.

And as the world has gone mobile, portable and wireless, the same is trueof the many smartphones, tablets, and ultrabooks that inhabit our lives.In such connected computing devices, for every 32-bit ARM or Atom actingas the main CPU, there are at least a half a dozen or more embedded MCUs.

And one of the fastest growth areas is anything to do with capacitive touchsensor-based gesture recognition, well illustrated by the hard-sell videosfrom companies such as TexasInstruments, Microchip,Freescale,Cypress andAtmel.But the opportunies this offers to developers comes at the cost of greaterdesign and development complexity as the recent Embedded.com design articles,webinars and technical papers collected here illustrate, including:

Gesturerecognition – first step toward 3D UIs
The challenges of multi-touch gesture interfaces
Capacitive sensing for advanced user interfaces .

One measure of still increasing opportunities and challenges ahead arethe number of research projects pushing gesture recognition to its limits.Included in the Resources Around The Network section are a numberof recent conference papers and journal reports, of which my Editor’sTop Picks are:

3D Hand Gesture Recognition Based on Sensor Fusion
A $3 gesture recognizer for devices with 3D acceleration
A UI with semantic tactile feedback for mobile devices

Embedded.com Site Editor Bernard Cole is also editor of the twice-a-week Embedded.com newsletters as well as a partner in the TechRite Associates editorial services consultancy. He welcomes your feedback. Send an email to , or call 928-525-9087.

See more articles and column like this one on Embedded.com.Sign up for s ubscriptions and newsletters . Copyright © 2012 UBM–All rights reserved.

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