Illuminating Gray Codes, LFSRs, K-Maps & More - Embedded.com

Illuminating Gray Codes, LFSRs, K-Maps & More

I was just thinking about the wide variety of topics I've written about over the years. This caused me to look up some of my old columns, many of which are “evergreen” in that they introduce and illuminate fundamental concepts.

As I was re-reading these, I thought: “This is interesting stuff that will be useful for a lot of folks who are just starting out in the industry or who haven’t looked at these topics for a while,” so I decided to remind everyone that these articles are still available for you to peruse and ponder.

I must admit that I'm really rather proud of some of these topics, such as generating sub-2^n Gray code count sequences and “n-ary” (non-Boolean) Gray codes. I'd really be interested to hear if any of the points I made in these articles make you say something like: “Wow, that's interesting — I never knew that!”

Also, the articles shown above are just the ones that popped into my head when I was thinking about this. If you remember any other “fundamental” or “tutorial” columns that I've written that fit into this general theme, I'd really appreciate it if you could remind me of them.

22 thoughts on “Illuminating Gray Codes, LFSRs, K-Maps & More

  1. “Maxnnthee certainly are some gems here. I have always believed that there was a need for a course/book called “Finishing School for Newly Graduated Electrical Engineers”. I think these could be the basis.”

    Log in to Reply
  2. “I used to hate starting at 0 — now I can't imagine doing it any other way — the only problem arises when the objects you are connecting to in the real world are numbered from '1' … then you have a graunching decision to make…”

    Log in to Reply
  3. “Why, thank you Aubrey – that's very kind of you. This stuff is a mix of what I learned in college and then additional nuggets I learned as the years went by.”

    Log in to Reply
  4. “To tell you the truth, this has been niggling on my mind — I wrote lots of notes that were to form the basis for a few articles — but then things got pushed to the back-burner.nnWhat I really need to do is (a) lay my hands on a bunch of relays and (b)

    Log in to Reply
  5. “Relays is exciting topic – especially when building primitive computer is involved. Showing basic digital blocks would be really interesting in such problem. Just a suggestion.”

    Log in to Reply
  6. “Where and when is the nearest hamfest to you?nnThere's also your friendly neighborhood electronics surplus store. Of course the most likely one went out of business as I recall…nnLook for an old PLC or other industrial control. They usually have rel

    Log in to Reply
  7. “I agree — relays are just interesting — it's a completely different way of working — I'd love to do this — it's only time (and money) that's holding me back :-)”

    Log in to Reply
  8. “I guess I could work only with single-pole (SP) normally-open (NO) relays. But given a choice I'd prefer to work with changeover relays, which I tend to thing of as the relay equivalent to a single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switch.nnFurthermore, if there

    Log in to Reply
  9. “I have six really tasty SPDT antique relays — black Bakelite base — all the working open to the elements — that I picked up from Mock Electronics before they went put of business — I might use these as the centerpiece…”

    Log in to Reply
  10. “I was going to offer max a bunch of 24V relays (I do work in industrial interfacing), and throw in a 24V power supply. There are LED indicators, but most of the relays are the opaque orange or black ones. Sorry Max. We are going to have to wait for your i

    Log in to Reply
  11. “As I told David in an email, what I need to do (when I get a free moment) is to sit down, work out what function I wish to implement (maybe a small ALU or a small state machine) and then guestimate how many relays I'll need.nnOff the top of my head, I'm

    Log in to Reply
  12. “Max… “So, where can I get a lot of small relays very cheaply?” nnI can get you pretty much as many as you want of these:nnhttp://www.okorelays.com/oko/datasheets/47W.pdfnnOnly trouble is, they are 48Volt coils. I seem to remember offerin

    Log in to Reply
  13. “Great stuff Max, you should Write a book. Oh, sorry, you already did (and very good it is too).nnOne thing you may be able to correct. In the gray code series, all parts have a link to the next part at the end, except part 3.”

    Log in to Reply
  14. “@Elizabeth… “Look for an old PLC or other industrial control. They usually have relays on their I/O.” This is true, but they are usually 24V coil relays, Max wants 5V or 12V types. Also, as he told me in an email in response to my below post, he is

    Log in to Reply
  15. “Further to my above post, I found that most of the EA2 5V types are latching, and I can get quite a few (each unit has around 15 of them). Latching ones might be interesting. You put voltage on the coil one way to set them, and the other way to reset th

    Log in to Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.