Kontron ships new I/O intensive VX305C-40G 3U VPX SBC

Kontron announced the first customer shipments of its new VX305C-40G 3U OpenVPX Open Systems Architecture SBC module to Herrick Technology Laboratories and another major U.S. system integrator. Developed in alignment with the SOSA Technical Standard, the Kontron VX305C-40G is the first instance of a new, fully-defined OpenVPX SBC profile, which was designed specifically to meet the needs of the U.S. defense community in their drive for Open System Architecture computing platforms.

Designed to the soon-to-be-released VITA 65 slot profile SLT3-PAY-1F1F2U1TU1T1U1T-14.2.16, known as the “I/O Intensive SBC profile”, the VX305C-40G combines the computational power of the 12-core Intel Xeon D-1559 processor with a rich assortment of I/O, most notably the 40 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) Data Plane. The Kontron VX305C-40G opens a new era in OSA for defense systems.

Herrick is integrating the VX305C-40G SBC with a Model 71813 XMC board from Pentek, which will provide customizable I/O signal status and control for their new SOSA(TM) C4ISR demonstrator system for the U.S. Army. Herrick selected the VX305C-40G specifically to demonstrate the I/O Intensive SBC functionality needed for their system. The performance and extensive I/O of the VX305C-40G gives Herrick the ability to bring a new level of server-class computing and digital signal processing to the battlefield using open systems architectures, and fills a critical niche in OSA platforms.

The goal of OSA standards activities such as SOSA is to reduce the cost of defense systems and to enable more rapid technology upgrades. By tightly defining the physical connectivity and a minimum feature set for hardware modules, OSA products like the VX305C-40G can potentially reduce technology upgrade project times from months or years to days or weeks. Systems can also be rapidly changed as their missions evolve and new technologies bring new capabilities. Common slot profiles and functionalities defined in OSA standards increase the likelihood that new hardware modules will “just work” when inserted into an existing system.

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