Sensor hubs get tiny motion module - Embedded.com

Sensor hubs get tiny motion module

Microchip Technology has just introduced a second generation MIPS-derived processor hub for use in space-constrained embedded apps for the Internet of Things, wearable fitness monitoring, remote controls, and gaming.

Unlike the first generation SSC7102, which was made available in an 84-in TFBGA (thin and fine ball grid array) form, the new SSC7150 is in an 28-pin QFN (quad flatpack no leads) package and is only available as part of its newest MM7150 motion module.

To make sensor hub capabilities available to space constrained IoT apps, MM7150 is no larger than a standard CR2032 coin cell battery.

To make sensor hub capabilities available to space constrained IoT apps, MM7150 is no larger than a standard CR2032 coin cell battery.

Designed for use in the extremely small custom-printed circuit boards typical of such designs, the module measures 17mm x 17mm, about the size of a standard CR2032 coin cell battery (Figure 1). All components are integrated, calibrated and available on the module for PCB mounting.

In the active mode, the 3.3 Volt module consumes about 7.68 mA of active mode current. But reflecting its usage in a variety of untethered IoT and wearable apps, the motion module in the deep sleep mode consumes only 70 micro-Amperes, about four times lower than the standalone predecessor 7102 CPU.

In addition to a MIPS-based 32-bit processor, the nine-axis 17 x 17 mm motion module also incorporates 3-axis accelerometer, 3-axis magnetometer and 3-axis gyroscope.

In addition to a MIPS-based 32-bit processor, the nine-axis 17 x 17 mm motion module also incorporates 3-axis accelerometer, 3-axis magnetometer and 3-axis gyroscope.

“The earlier SS7102 chip was designed for use by developers working for large OEMs who have already developed their own software and hardware solutions for integrating nine axis sensor fusion capabilities into their designs,” said Microchip Computing Products Group VP Patrick Johnson. “The MM7150 module, on the other hand, is targeted at the many IoT and wearable apps developers who want a solution that can easily be integrated into their custom boards and allows them to get to market fast.”

Microchip was aware that such developers may not have all the experience in software and firmware development necessary for a sensor fusion application. To combat this, the motion module is preloaded with firmware not only for nine axis sensor software development, but for sensor-data pass through, magnetic distortion detection and suppression, and gyroscope drift cancellation as well.


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